Allele-specific DNA methylation across brain and blood

Speaker: Sarah Marzi , MRC SGDP Research Centre, Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College London, UK

Date: Friday, April 11, 2014

Time: 9:30 AM to 11:00 AM Note: all times are in the Eastern Time Zone

Public: Yes

Location: 32-G882

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Host: Manolis Kellis

Contact: derek aylward, 617 715 4882, derekaylward@csail.mit.edu

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Reminders to: csbi-events@mit.edu, talks@broad.mit.edu, seminars@csail.mit.edu, almlab@mit.edu, kellislab@mit.edu,

Reminder Subject: TALK: Sarah Marzi "Allele-specific DNA methylation across brain and blood"

While most DNA methylation is thought to be symmetrical across both alleles throughout the genome, there are some notable exceptions. Genomic imprinting and X chromosome inactivation are two well-studied sources of allele-specific
(or allelically-skewed) methylation (ASM), but recent research has indicated a more complex pattern in which genotypic variation can be associated with DNA methylation in cis. Given the known heterogeneity of methylation across tissues and cell types we explored inter and intra-individual variation in ASM across multiple human brain tissues and whole blood from multiple individuals. We used SNP microarrays to
quantitatively assess ASM in amplicons covering ~8% of the human genome following cleavage with a cocktail of methylation-sensitive restriction
enzymes (MSREs). Consistent with previous studies, we find widespread ASM with >4% of the ~220,000 loci interrogated showing evidence of allelic skewing. A large proportion of ASM appears to be tissue-specific, with ~50% of ASM loci identified within an individual being specific to one tissue, with higher levels observed in blood compared to brain. Interestingly, cross-tissue ASM is enriched in regions of the genome associated with lincRNAs. These findings contribute to our understanding
about the nature of differential DNA methylation across tissues and have important implications for genetic studies of complex disease.

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Created by derek aylward Email at Thursday, April 10, 2014 at 9:47 AM.