Augmented Social Cognition: Using Web2.0 technology to enhance the ability of groups to remember, think, and reason

Speaker: Ed Chi , PARC

Date: Tuesday, February 03, 2009

Time: 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM

Refreshments: 11:00 AM

Public: Yes

Location: Patil Conference Room (32-G449)

Event Type:

Room Description:

Host: Rob Miller, MIT CSAIL

Contact: Rob Miller, x4-6028, rcm@mit.edu

Relevant URL:

Speaker URL: None

Speaker Photo:
None

Reminders to: seminars@csail.mit.edu, hci-seminar@csail.mit.edu

Reminder Subject: TALK: Augmented Social Cogniton: Using Web2.0 technology to enhance the ability of groups to remember, think, and reason

We are experiencing the new Social Web, where people share, communicate, commiserate, and conflict with each other. As evidenced by Wikipedia and del.icio.us, Web 2.0 environments are turning people into social information foragers and sharers. Users interact to resolve conflicts and jointly make sense of topic areas from "Obama vs. Clinton" to "Islam."

PARC's Augmented Social Cognition researchers -- who come from cognitive psychology, computer science, HCI, sociology, and other disciplines -- focus on understanding how to "enhance a group of people's ability to remember, think, and reason". Through Web 2.0 systems like social tagging, blogs, Wikis, and more, we can finally study, in detail, these types of enhancements on a very large scale.

In this talk, we summarize recent PARC work and early findings on: (1) how conflict and coordination have played out in Wikipedia, and how social transparency might affect reader trust; (2) how decreasing interaction costs might change participation in social tagging systems; and (3) how computation can help organize user-generated content and metadata.

Speaker Bio:

Ed H. Chi is area manager and senior research scientist at Palo Alto Research Center's Augmented Social Cognition Group. He leads the group in understanding how Web2.0 and Social Computing systems help groups of people to remember, think and reason. Ed completed his three degrees (B.S., M.S., and Ph.D.) in 6.5 years from University of Minnesota, and has been doing research on user interface software systems since 1993. He has been featured and quoted in the press, such as the Economist, Time Magazine, LA Times, and the Associated Press.

With 19 patents and over 50 research articles, his most well-known past project is the study of Information Scent --- understanding how users navigate and understand the Web and information environments. He has also worked on computational molecular biology, ubicomp, and recommendation/search engines. He has won awards for both teaching and research. In his spare time, Ed is an avid Taekwondo martial artist, photographer, and snowboarder.

This talk is part of the Yahoo/EECS HCI-IR Seminar Series on human-computer interaction and information retrieval.

Research Areas:

Impact Areas:

See other events that are part of the HCI Seminar Series spring 2009.

Created by Linda L. Julien Email at Wednesday, June 19, 2013 at 6:23 AM.