A Decentralized Blockchain with Near Optimal Throughput and Latency

Speaker: Fan Long , University of Toronto

Date: Friday, May 17, 2019

Time: 1:00 PM to 2:00 PM

Public: Yes

Location: 7th Floor G Tower Lounge

Event Type: Seminar

Room Description:

Host: Martin Rinard, MIT-CSAIL

Contact: Mary McDavitt, 6172539620, mmcdavit@csail.mit.edu

Relevant URL:

Speaker URL: None

Speaker Photo:
None

Reminders to: seminars@csail.mit.edu

Reminder Subject: TALK: A Decentralized Blockchain with Near Optimal Throughput and Latency

Abstract:

I will present Conflux, a scalable and decentralized blockchain system that
achieves near-optimal throughput and latency, with respect to underlying P2P
gossip network bandwidth and propagation delay.

Conflux operates with a novel consensus protocol which optimistically processes
concurrent blocks without discarding any as forks and adaptively assigns
weights to blocks based on their topologies in the Conflux ledger structure
(called Tree-Graph). The adaptive weight mechanism enables Conflux to detect
and thwart liveness attack by automatically switching between a fast mode in
normal scenarios and a structured mode to ensure consensus progress during
liveness attacks.

We evaluated Conflux on Amazon EC2 clusters with up to 12k full nodes. The
consensus protocol of Conflux achieves a block throughput of 9.38Mbps with
20Mbps network bandwidth limit per node. On a combined workload of payment
transactions and Ethereum history transactions, the end-to-end system of
Conflux achieves the throughput of up to 3480 transactions per second while
confirming transactions under one minute.

Bio:

Fan Long is an Assistant Professor at University of Toronto. His research interests include programming language, systems security, software engineering, and blockchain. He is a recipient of ACM SIGSOFT Outstanding Dissertation Award and MIT Best Dissertation Award. He is also a co-Founder of Conflux, a project to build the next generation scalable, permission-less, and high performance blockchain.

Research Areas:

Impact Areas:

This event is not part of a series.

Created by Mary McDavitt Email at Wednesday, May 15, 2019 at 12:15 PM.